Architectural Styles (2 of 2)

There are utterly amazing examples of all the major architectural styles in intown Atlanta. Sarah and Lisa would love to help you find you favorite! You can also check out the Neighborhood Pages on Chatel Group’s Website for more details
on specific neighborhoods. In our last website blog, we listed several major architectural styles, and this time we will pick up where we left off!

Craftsman Houses

History: The Craftsman bungalow (also known as Arts and Crafts) was a popular house style between 1905 and the 1930s, and it’s making a major player today. Highly desirable and very popular intown Atlanta.

Elevation & Features: If you’re wondering what a Craftsman house looks like, step inside. One distinguishing feature of the style is the large amount of interior woodwork, such as built-in shelving and seating. As for the exterior, Craftsman-style homes often have low-pitched roofs with wide eave overhangs, exposed roof rafters, decorative beams or braces under gables, and porches framed by tapered square columns.

Craftsman bungalows often have unfinished but usable space in the attic that can offer great renovation opportunities.

Cottage Style Homes

History: Medieval styles of the English countryside inspired American architects to design the charming and cozy cottage-style houses we know today. The style became especially popular in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s.

Elevation & Features: Common features of cottage style house plans include a warm, storybook character, steep roof pitches and cross gables, arched doors, casement windows with small panes, and brick, stone, or stucco siding.

Mediterranean-Style Houses

History: Mediterranean styles of architecture, such as Spanish colonial revival (also known as Spanish farmhouse or Spanish eclectic) flourished in Southern California during the 1920s and 1930s following a noteworthy appearance at the Panama-California Exposition of 1915.

Elevation & Features: Mediterranean-style homes often feature a low-pitched red tile roof, arches, grillwork, and a stucco or adobe exterior. The typical U-shape Mediterranean floor plan is oriented around a central courtyard and fountain, making the
garden an extension of the living space. Rooms open to the courtyard, promoting cooling cross-ventilation and the flow of fresh air.

Traditional Ranch Homes

History: Traditional ranch-style homes usually have simple floor plans, attached garages, and efficient living spaces. The style dates back to 1932 and is still being built today. It was one of the most popular styles in the suburban home-building boom of the 1950s and 1960s.

Elevation & Features: Although they may appear plain or cookie-cutter on the outside, ranch-style homes offer great potential for additions. Bilevel and trilevel homes evolved from the ranch style and were built during the same era. Because of their simplicity, ranch-style house plans are easy to upgrade with additions.

Contemporary-Style Homes

History: Referring specifically to architect-designed homes built from about 1950 to 1970, the term “contemporary” has come to describe a wide range of houses built in recent decades that concentrate on simple forms and geometric lines.

Elevation & Features: Many contemporary homes feature lots of glass, open floor plans, and inventive designs. Without elaborate ornamentation and unnecessary detail, the exteriors of contemporary homes often feature a dynamic mix of contrasting materials and textures, exposed roof beams, and flat or low-pitched roofs.

Take a look at some of the other great architectural homes Sarah and Lisa have found, or help sell for their clients.

Contact them today and let them help you find the home that you love!

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